13th Amendment - SAF-14

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13th Amendment

The Civil War
 
 
 
 

   13th. Amendment
    to the U.S. Constitution


   Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for
   crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the
   United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

   Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate
   legislation.

 

Proposal and Ratification


The thirteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States was proposed to the legislatures of the several states by the thirty-eighth congress, on the 31st day of January, 1865, and was declared, in a proclamation of the Secretary of State, dated the 18th of December, 1865, to have been ratified by the legislatures of twenty-seven of the thirty-six states. The dates of ratification were:

Illinois, February 1, 1865                 

Rhode Island, February 2, 1865

Michigan, February 2, 1865

Maryland, February 3, 1865;

New York, February 3, 1865;

Pennsylvania, February 3, 1865

 West Virginia, February 3, 1865

Missouri, February 6, 1865

Maine, February 7, 1865

Kansas, February 7, 1865

Massachusetts, February 7, 1865

Virginia, February 9, 1865

Ohio, February 10, 1865

Indiana, February 13, 1865

Nevada, February 16, 1865

Louisiana, February 17, 1865

Minnesota, February 23, 1865

Wisconsin, February 24, 1865

Vermont, March 9, 1865

Tennessee, April 7, 1865

Arkansas, April 14, 1865

Connecticut, May 4, 1865

Connecticut, May 4, 1865

Connecticut, May 4, 1865

South Carolina, November 13, 1865

Alabama, December 2, 1865

North Carolina, December 4, 1865

Georgia, December 6, 1865

Mississippi, February 13, 2013

The state of Mississippi was the last state to ratify the amendment.  After a time it became more of an oversite than a deliberate attempt to make a statement against what the amendment stands for.  That oversite was corrected very revemtly on February 13, 2013.  more...

Date Last Modified: 1/16/2017
 
 
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